Māori Resilience

Issues relating to the endurance and resilience of Maori

Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030

The recent Third World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction, held from 14 to 18 March 2015 in Sendai, Miyagi, Japan, has released its Framework for Action for the next 15 years. Intentions are for a ‘broader and a more people-centred preventive approach to disaster risk. Disaster risk reduction practices need to be multi-hazard and multisectoral…

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Taku marae e…

A report from Stats NZ gives insight into the continued importance of our marae Most Māori know their ancestral marae, connect to it through visiting, and want to go more often Te Kupenga results showed more than half (62 percent) had been to their ancestral marae at some time in their lives and around one-third…

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2014 Reflection

Recently I was invited onto a panel to reflect on the earthquake research we have been doing since, well,m the earthquake started! I mentioned three things. The first is the spontaneous attention given to disaster in our work as our attention on this began with the event, right? Without the February 20122 earthquake, I wouldn’t…

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New website

I’ve built a new website as a location for our work on Maori Resilience. It includes all our work on the Christchurch earthquakes, plus the work of peers and colleagues, updates on the National Science Challenges (particularly the Resilience to Natures Risks theme), and international projects that are connected to wider Indigenous development. Link to…

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Special MAI Journal issue on Maori Resilience

Just published free and online by Nga Pae o te Maramatanga’s MAI (Maori and Indigenous) Journal along with five other teams researching the concept of resilience for Maori. In my article, titled “Maori and the Christchurch Earthquakes: the interplay between Indigenous endurance and resilience through urban disaster” – I discuss the challenges for urban Indigenous…

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Japanese architects’ respond to the Great East Japan Earthquake

Enjoyed visiting an exhibition of work done by Japanese architects to ‘re-clothe’ the post-disaster landscape of East Japan after its tragic earthquake and tsunami in March of 2011. I have always admired the Japanese sense of space and place, their respect for the natural environment – especially tress – and the sheer cleverness of their…

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Webinar: Indigenous Knowledge and Disaster Risk Reduction Network, World Social Science Fellows, Risk Interpretation and Action:

It was my pleasure and privilege to deliver the first of a series of Webinars from the Indigenous Knowledge and Disaster Risk Reduction Network, supported by the World Social Science Fellows, Risk Interpretation and Action (RIA) programme. I presented an overview of our Otautahi/Christchurch research which looks at the impacts of a major disaster on…

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Rare Bravery Award for Maori Fireman

One of the supporters of our research has been Scott Shadbolt, a Ngai Tahu Urban Search and Rescue who performed a double amputation with a hacksaw and a Leatherman knife on Brian Coker inside the Pyne Gould Corporation building. The Valour Medal, the firefighters equivalent of the Victoria Cross, has only been given out three…

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Post-disaster housing for whanau in Christchurch

A report by Te Puawaitangi ki Otautahi reveals the struggle to find accommodation in the city after the earthquakes. Their survey found that housing has ‘declined dramatically’ with the standard of most housing deteriorating and the high costs of private rental meaning many whanau have to share their home with extended family, sometimes having to…

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Research, reportage, and debate

A recent Press article which I and others were interviewed for has revealed a certain dis-ease in the research arena when the article was mentioned in the recent 7th Australasian Natural Hazards Management Conference in Wellington. Seems our work has been interpreted as a deliberate slur on Ngai Tahu. Now I know who’s involved (’tis…

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