Dryland Pastures

Sub clover cultivars – get in the mix

Post prepared by the Dryland Pastures Research Team – Dr S.T. Olykan, C.S. Teixeira (PhD candidate), Mr R.J. Lucas, Prof D.J. Moot and Dr A. Mills. Why choose sub clover? Sub clover suits a summer dry environment because: In a mixed pasture it may provide 2 to 4 t/ha of high quality herbage for lactating…

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More about sub clovers in autumn: it is not hard to understand hard seeds

Posted on behalf of Carmen Teixeira (PhD candidate with the Dryland Pasture Research Team) The longevity of sub clover in the swards is largely controlled by seed hardness. Seed hardness is common in legumes such as sub clover. It is a strategy to prevent germination during unsuitable ecological conditions, mainly when the probability of seedling…

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Planning for sub clover dominant spring pastures in autumn

Want sub clover for your lactating ewes in spring? Plan for it now. For those of you wanting to sow sub clover this autumn, here is some advice to get you started. Why sub clover? Sub clover seed costs about $120-$150/ha plus drilling costs. The sub clover may provide 2-4 t DM/ha in a mixed pasture during spring…

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Status of a spring sown lucerne cultivar evaluation in early autumn

In this clip Derrick Moot and Ag Sci Hons student Grace Clouston of the Dryland Pastures Research Team discuss the status of a irrigated lucerne cultivar evaluation that was sown on 21 October 2016 (approx 2 mins).

Recovery of the cocksfoot/sub/balansa pasture following January rains

On 1 February 2016, Dick Lucas ventured out to the MaxAnnuals grazing experiment to investigate the recovery of the dryland cocksfoot pasture established with subterranean and balansa clovers at Ashley Dene, Canterbury. Topics covered include yield, germination of the annual clovers and target populations for high quality spring forage. The potential for a ‘false break’…

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State of spring sown lucerne during the establishment phase prior to the first graze

These videos, taken on 25 Jan, we look at the state of a newly established – spring sown – dryland lucerne stand. In the first video Derrick discusses the state of the young lucerne at about 80-90 days after sowing as we prepare for the first graze/cut now flower buds are visible. There is also…

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Lucerne root growth and access to soil moisture

In this video Prof Derrick Moot discusses the differences between established and establishing lucerne stands in relation to the rate at which the roots explore and exploit water stored in the soil. Known as the extraction front velocity (EFV) this is a measure in millimeters of soil per day that the plant roots access to…

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Late autumn annual clover pasture status – the hybrid ryegrass/sub clover mix

In this, the final video blog in the late autumn field walk series taken in early May, we look at the state of the fourth treatment in our ‘MaxAnnuals’ Experiment at Ashley Dene, Canterbury (approx. 4 mins). This pasture was established with the following dryland pasture mix in autumn 2013: 10 kg/ha ‘Ultra Enhanced’ perennial…

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Late autumn annual clover pasture status – the cocksfoot/sub clover mix

In this video we look at the third of the dryland pasture mixes which forms part of our grass/clover experiment at Ashley Dene, Canterbury. (approx. 6 mins) This pasture was established with: 2 kg/ha ‘Greenly’ cocksfoot (orchardgrass; Dactylis glomerata) 10 kg/ha subterranean clover (5 kg/ha ‘Denmark’ plus 5 kg/ha ‘Rosabrook’; Trifolium subterraneum) 0.5 kg/ha ‘Tonic’…

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