Dryland Pastures

Cool sub clovers and the low winter temperatures

Prepared by: Carmen Teixeira (PhD candidate) and edited by the Dryland Pastures Research Team (Prof. Derrick Moot, Mr Dick Lucas, Dr Sonya Olykan and Dr Annamaria Mills) Winter has arrived and this time is associated with Matariki (the Māori New Year), and also marks the shift of the sun’s journey in the sky (see the…

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More about sub clovers in autumn: it is not hard to understand hard seeds

Posted on behalf of Carmen Teixeira (PhD candidate with the Dryland Pasture Research Team) The longevity of sub clover in the swards is largely controlled by seed hardness. Seed hardness is common in legumes such as sub clover. It is a strategy to prevent germination during unsuitable ecological conditions, mainly when the probability of seedling…

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Disappointing lucerne not so disappointing – when you do the right calculations!

Every now and then we hear about animals performing poorly on lucerne compared to grass pastures – yes it can happen and for several reasons (ill thift, lack of time to acclimatise to a new feed source, lack of access to fibre and salt …) – but, when it comes down to facts, mean daily…

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Sub clover germinating in Marlborough this season

Here are some photos of sub clover taken by Doug Avery on ‘Bonavaree’ Farm in Marlborough. Legume–dominant pasture in spring 2016 The photo below shows Fraser Avery standing in high quality legume dominant pasture last spring (1 October 2016). This is ‘Antas’ sub clover which has been allowed to set seed in its first year and…

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Planning for sub clover dominant spring pastures in autumn

Want sub clover for your lactating ewes in spring? Plan for it now. For those of you wanting to sow sub clover this autumn, here is some advice to get you started. Why sub clover? Sub clover seed costs about $120-$150/ha plus drilling costs. The sub clover may provide 2-4 t DM/ha in a mixed pasture during spring…

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Sub clover dies late spring: to bury or not to bury? That’s the question!

Dryland Pastures Research Team (coordinated by Prof. D. Moot), Lincoln University Carmen Teixeira, Dick Lucas and Annamaria Mills. It is summer time New Zealand and the sub clover plants sown in last autumn have died. Few sub clover flowers are visible compared to November (see our previous post “What’s up with the Subs 4 Spring”)….

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Ode to 2016

Posted on behalf of Prof Derrick Moot. In all of my life, 26 years with my wife, I don’t think that there has been A year to remember, from Jan to December, as tumultuous as twenty sixteen Post truth we are now, but we got here how? An unfathomable political season For Brexit we know,…

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Lucerne in dairy systems

Professor Derrick Moot was on a dairy farm in the North Island last week where he took these images of dairy cows enjoying a pure lucerne stand prior to their afternoon milking. The farmer uses the lucerne from about 11.00am and then collects the cows after lunch for milking. Prof Moot advised the entry height of…

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What’s up with Subs 4 Spring?

An update of sub clover cultivars reproductive development – November 24, 2016.  Prepared by Carmen Teixeira, (PhD student Dryland Pastures Research Team) & Derrick Moot with the Dryland Pastures Research Team, Lincoln University It is late spring and the sub clovers plants have already flowered! This year, in Canterbury the late rains in mid-November have extended the…

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